Machine Learning (Theory)

3/18/2005

Binomial Weighting

Tags: Online,Papers,Problems jl@ 8:16 pm

Suppose we have a set of classifiers c making binary predictions from an input x and we see examples in an online fashion. In particular, we repeatedly see an unlabeled example x, make a prediction y’(possibly based on the classifiers c), and then see the correct label y.

When one of these classifiers is perfect, there is a great algorithm available: predict according to the majority vote over every classifier consistent with every previous example. This is called the Halving algorithm. It makes at most log2 |c| mistakes since on any mistake, at least half of the classifiers are eliminated.

Obviously, we can’t generally hope that the there exists a classifier which never errs. The Binomial Weighting algorithm is an elegant technique allowing a variant Halving algorithm to cope with errors by creating a set of virtual classifiers for every classifier which occasionally disagree with the original classifier. The Halving algorithm on this set of virtual classifiers satisfies a theorem of the form:

errors of binomial weighting algorithm less than minc f(number of errors of c, number of experts)

The Binomial weighting algorithm takes as a parameter the maximal minimal number of mistakes of a classifier. By introducing a “prior” over the number of mistakes, it can be made parameter free. Similarly, introducing a “prior” over the set of classifiers is easy and makes the algorithm sufficiently flexible for common use.

However, there is a problem. The minimal value of f() is 2 times the number of errors of any classifier, regardless of the number of classifiers. This is frustrating because a parameter-free learning algorithm taking an arbitrary “prior” and achieving good performance on an arbitrary (not even IID) set of examples is compelling for implementation and use, if we had a good technique for removing the factor of 2. How can we do that?

See the weighted majority algorithm for an example of a similar algorithm which can remove a factor of 2 using randomization and at the expense of introducing a parameter. There are known techniques for eliminating this parameter, but they appear not as tight (and therefore practically useful) as introducing a “prior” over the number of errors.

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