Machine Learning (Theory)

11/9/2013

Graduates and Postdocs

Several strong graduates are on the job market this year.

  • Alekh Agarwal made the most scalable public learning algorithm as an intern two years ago. He has a deep and broad understanding of optimization and learning as well as the ability and will to make things happen programming-wise. I’ve been privileged to have Alekh visiting me in NY where he will be sorely missed.
  • John Duchi created Adagrad which is a commonly helpful improvement over online gradient descent that is seeing wide adoption, including in Vowpal Wabbit. He has a similarly deep and broad understanding of optimization and learning with significant industry experience at Google. Alekh and John have often coauthored together.
  • Stephane Ross visited me a year ago over the summer, implementing many new algorithms and working out the first scale free online update rule which is now the default in Vowpal Wabbit. Stephane is not on the market—Google robbed the cradle successfully :-) I’m sure that he will do great things.
  • Anna Choromanska visited me this summer, where we worked on extreme multiclass classification. She is very good at focusing on a problem and grinding it into submission both in theory and in practice—I can see why she wins awards for her work. Anna’s future in research is quite promising.

I also wanted to mention some postdoc openings in machine learning.

12/29/2012

Simons Institute Big Data Program

Tags: Announcements,Funding,Workshop jl@ 8:17 am

Michael Jordan sends the below:

The new Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing
will begin organizing semester-long programs starting in 2013.

One of our first programs, set for Fall 2013, will be on the “Theoretical Foundations
of Big Data Analysis”. The organizers of this program are Michael Jordan (chair),
Stephen Boyd, Peter Buehlmann, Ravi Kannan, Michael Mahoney, and Muthu Muthukrishnan.

See http://simons.berkeley.edu/program_bigdata2013.html for more information on
the program.

The Simons Institute has created a number of “Research Fellowships” for young
researchers (within at most six years of the award of their PhD) who wish to
participate in Institute programs, including the Big Data program. Individuals
who already hold postdoctoral positions or who are junior faculty are welcome
to apply, as are finishing PhDs.

Please note that the application deadline is January 15, 2013. Further details
are available at http://simons.berkeley.edu/fellows.html .

Mike Jordan

3/13/2012

The Submodularity workshop and Lucca Professorship

Nina points out the Submodularity Workshop March 19-20 next week at Georgia Tech. Many people want to make Submodularity the new Convexity in machine learning, and it certainly seems worth exploring.

Sara Olson also points out a tenured faculty position at IMT Lucca with a deadline of May 15th. Lucca happens to be the ancestral home of 1/4 of my heritage :-)

2/29/2012

Key Scientific Challenges and the Franklin Symposium

For graduate students, the Yahoo! Key Scientific Challenges program including in machine learning is on again, due March 9. The application is easy and the $5K award is high quality “no strings attached” funding. Consider submitting.

Those in Washington DC, Philadelphia, and New York, may consider attending the Franklin Institute Symposium April 25 which has several speakers and an award for V. Attendance is free with an RSVP.

11/26/2011

Giving Thanks

Tags: Funding,Research jl@ 7:40 pm

Thanksgiving is perhaps my favorite holiday, because pausing your life and giving thanks provides a needed moment of perspective.

As a researcher, I am most thankful for my education, without which I could not function. I want to share this, because it provides some sense of how a researcher starts.

  1. My long term memory seems to function particularly well, which makes any education I get is particularly useful.
  2. I am naturally obsessive, which makes me chase down details until I fully understand things. Natural obsessiveness can go wrong, of course, but it’s a great ally when you absolutely must get things right.
  3. My childhood was all in one hometown, which was a conscious sacrifice on the part of my father, implying disruptions from moving around were eliminated. I’m not sure how important this was since travel has it’s own benefits, but it bears thought.
  4. I had several great teachers in grade school, and naturally gravitated towards teachers over classmates, as they seemed more interesting. I particularly remember Mr. Cox, who read Watership Down 10 minutes a day. The frustration of not getting to the ending drove me into reading books on my own, including just about every science fiction book in Lebanon Oregon.
  5. I spent a few summers picking strawberries and blueberries. It’s great motivation to not do that sort of thing for a living.
  6. Lebanon school district was willing to bend the rules for me, so I could skip unnecessary math classes. I ended up a year advanced, taking math from our local community college during senior year in high school.
  7. College applications was a very nervous time, because high quality colleges cost much more than we could reasonably expect to pay. I was very lucky to get into Caltech here. Caltech should not be thought of as a university—instead, it’s a research lab which happens to have a few undergraduate students running around. I understand from Preston that the operating budget is about 4% tuition these days. This showed in the financial aid package, where they basically let me attend for the cost of room&board. Between a few scholarships and plentiful summer research opportunities, I managed to graduate debt free. Caltech was also an exceptional place to study, because rules like “no taking two classes at the same time” were never enforced them. The only limits on what you could learn were your own.
  8. Graduate school was another big step. Here, I think Avrim must have picked out my application to Carnegie Mellon, which was a good fit for me. At the time, I knew I wanted to do research in some sort of ML/AI subject area, but not really what, so the breadth of possibilities at CMU was excellent. In graduate school, your advisor is much more important, and between Avrim and Sebastian, I learned quite a bit. The funding which made this all work out was mostly hidden from me at CMU, but there was surely a strong dependence on NSF and DARPA. Tom Siebel also directly covered my final year as as a Siebel Scholar.
  9. Figuring out what to do next was again a nervous time, but it did work out, first in a summer postdoc with Michael Kearns, then at IBM research as a Herman Goldstine Fellow, then at TTI-Chicago, and now at Yahoo! Research for the last 5 years.

My life is just one anecdote, from which it’s easy to be misled. But trying to abstract the details, it seems like the critical elements for success are a good memory, an interest in getting the details right, motivation, and huge amounts of time to learn and then to do research. Given that many of the steps in this process winnow out large fractions of people, some amount of determination and sheer luck is involved. Does the right person manage to see you as a good possibility?

But mostly I’d like to give thanks for the “huge amounts of time” which in practical terms translates into access to other smart people and funding. In education and research funding is something like oxygen—you really miss it when it’s not there, so Thanksgiving is a good time to remember it.

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